Smoking tobacco leaves chemical traces on DNA

Smoking tobacco leaves chemical traces on DNA

Smoking tobacco leaves the chemical footprints on DNA. Tobacco smoke leaves its mark on DNA by changing a chemical code on the DNA molecule that can sometimes change gene activity, according to a new study. Some of these molecular changes revert to their original state when a smoker quits, but others persist in the long term, the researchers found. Experts have known for some time that smoking causes changes of the DNA molecule, but they are now learning more about how widespread the changes are, and what they may mean, said…

Apple buys another machine learning company called ‘Tuplejump’

Apple buys another machine learning company called ‘Tuplejump’

Apple inc is on buying spree of machine learning companies, Apple is on a machine learning company buying spree. After buying Perceptio at the end of 2015 and Turi just a few months ago, Apple has now acquired an India/US-based machine learning team, Tuplejump. We’d been hearing rumors of another acquisition in this space by Apple for some time. While Apple won’t outright confirm it, when asked about Tuplejump this morning, a representative from Apple gave us the company’s standard we’re-not-saying-yes-but-well-yes response that they only give when they have, in…

Mexico Chemical Plant Explosion Kills Three

Mexico Chemical Plant Explosion Kills Three

A deadly explosion at a major petrochemical facility in the Gulf state of Veracruz on Wednesday took the lives of at least three individuals, while injuring many more. There was a massive cloud of toxic chemicals sent into the sky. Luis Felipe Puente, head of federal emergency services says that at least 45 people were injured in the explosion. Pemex has said the incident occurred right around 3pm at the facility’s chlorinate 3 plant located near the port of Coatzacoalcos. This is one of the top oil export hubs in…

Human sleep patterns could be traced by the Slumbering ‘dragons’

Human sleep patterns could be traced by the Slumbering ‘dragons’

Earlier, sleep patterns were known for mammals and birds only but a new study published in the journal Science has discovered them in a non-avian reptile, the Australian bearded dragon, as well. Knowing about slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in a reptile could alter the models of how sleep patterns have evolved. Researchers said that sleep patterns may have evolved more than 300 million years ago. Gilles Laurent, director for the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt, said that if sleep patterns are noticed in…